The Personalities of Presidents as Independent Variables.

[11]  2020. “The Personalities of Presidents as Independent Variables.” Political Psychology. PDF.

 

The debate about the relative importance of the personality traits of presidents has a long history. Until the mid‐1970s, scholars of the presidency extensively focused on the uniqueness of the individuals that held office. However, the difficulty in capturing presidential personalities and measuring their impact on executive politics led to a significant quantitative shift that focused more on the institutions within which presidents operate. This change produced a long‐lasting divide between researchers interested in the “institutional” presidency and those focused on the “personal” presidency. I propose to integrate both approaches by incorporating insights from differential psychology to treat the personality traits of presidents as independent variables. In support of the argument, I use data from an expert survey that captured psychometric traits of presidents who governed the Western Hemisphere in 1945–2012 to reassess an influential study about Latin American presidents. The results show that adding openness to experience leads to a deeper understanding of presidential approval. I conclude by arguing that measuring the personality traits of all sorts of leaders is necessary to modernize the study of elites.

Judicial Reshuffles and Women Justices in Latin America

Judicial Reshuffles and Women Justices in Latin America.” American Journal of Political Science (with Aníbal Pérez-Liñán and Melanie Hughes). PDF

 

Can weak judicial institutions facilitate the advancement of women to the high courts? We explore the relationship between weak institutions and gender diversification by analyzing the consequences of judicial reshuffles in Latin America. Our theory predicts that institutional disruptions will facilitate the appointment of women justices, but only when left parties control the nomination process. We test this argument using difference‐in‐differences and dynamic panel models for 18 Latin American countries between 1961 and 2014. The analysis offers support for our hypothesis, but gains in gender diversification are modest in size and hard to sustain over time. Political reshuffles may produce short‐term advances for women in the judiciary, but they do not represent a path to substantive progress in gender equality.

Strategic Retirement in Comparative Perspective.

2017. “Strategic Retirement in Comparative Perspective.” (with Aníbal Pérez-Liñán) Journal of Law and Courts 5 (2): 173-197. PDF.

Students of judicial behavior debate whether justices time their retirement to allow for the nomination of like-minded judges. We formalize the assumptions of strategic retirement theory and derive precise hypotheses about the conditions that moderate the effect of partisan incentives on judicial retirements. The empirical implications are tested with evidence for Supreme Court members under democracies and dictatorships in six presidential regimes between 1900 and 2004. The theory of strategic retirement finds limited support in the United States and elsewhere. We conclude that researchers should emphasize “sincere” motivations for retirement, progressive political ambitions, and—crucial in weakly institutionalized legal systems—political pressures.

Chile 2016: The nadir of democratic legitimacy?

2017. “Chile 2016: The nadir of democratic legitimacy?” [In Spanish]  Revista de Ciencia Política 37 (2): 305-334. PDF.

This article argues that the legitimacy of the political system is currently at its lowest point since the return to democracy. Presidential approval ratings dipped to a record low in 2016. The year also saw the highest levels of electoral absenteeism and distrust in the three branches of government, and the lowest levels of identification with political parties. This low legitimacy of the political system can be attributed to cyclical —governmental mismanagement and corruption scandals— and underlying causes —interpersonal mistrust, detachment from the political activity and insulated elites—. If these trends continue, we may witness a transformation of the party system, the emergence of populist movements and leaders, and the erosion of the quality of Chilean democracy.

What Drives Evo’s Attempts to Remain in Power? A Psychological Explanation

2017. “What Drives Evo’s Attempts to Remain in Power? A Psychological Explanation.” Bolivian Studies Journal 22: 191-219. PDF.

The current Bolivian President, Evo Morales, has managed to govern longer than all of his predecessors thanks to his three successful attempts to relax his term limits. In this article I argue that the high risk-taking personality of Morales, especially his social risk-taking, helps to explain why he has consistently tried to extend his time in office. To address this proposition I follow a twofold strategy. First, I show the results of a survey conducted among experts in presidents of the Americas. This survey measured different personality traits of the leaders that governed between 1945 and 2012, including their risk-taking. Second, I examine some of the most important decisions that Morales has made throughout his adult life. Both the survey and the analysis of Morales’ trajectory suggest that his attempts to cling to power are rooted in his risk-taking.

How to Assess the Members of the Political Elite? A Proposal Based on Presidents of the Americas

2016. “How to Assess the Members of the Political Elite? A Proposal Based on Presidents of the Americas.” [In Spanish] Política 54 (1): 219-254. PDF.

This article critically reviews the study of the political elite, including the historical evolution of its meaning, role, composition, independence and ways of analysing its members. It argues that to effectively study elite  members  their  individual  differences  should  be  examined.  This  paper looks at individual differences among presidents, those at highest levels of the political elite in presidential systems. It finds that as a group, presidents of the Western Hemisphere come from moderately affluent socioeconomic  backgrounds,  at  least  one  third  are  either  lawyers  or  come  from  the  security  forces,  and  that  they  tend  to  score  low  on  agreeableness  and  neuroticism,  moderately  high  in  extroversion  and  openness  to  experience,  and  high  in  conscientiousness.  This  exercise  suggests a research agenda that may be extended to other members of the elite.

Aftershocks of Pinochet’s Constitution: the Chilean Post-Earthquake Reconstruction.

2016. “Aftershocks of Pinochet’s Constitution: the Chilean Post-Earthquake Reconstruction.” Latin American Perspectives 44(4): 62-80. PDF.

The criticism of the reconstruction that followed the cataclysm in Chile in 2010 has centered on contingent factors including the performance of politicians. An examination of the way structural factors conditioned the governmental response to the 8.8 earthquake shows that the constitution created by the military regime shaped the reconstruction through provisions that limited vertical and horizontal accountability in intrastate and state-society relations. The subsidiary state, executive-legislative power relations, the binomial electoral system, and the appointment rather than election of regional authorities favored a recovery effort that has been underinstitutionalized, privatized, characterized by scant participation of victims, and marred by irregularities. An analysis of governmental reports, media outlets, polls, and semistructured interviews conducted with legislators, social leaders, and scholars sheds light on the relation between the constitution and the recovery.

Picture Budgetary Negotiations How the Chilean Congress Overcomes its Constitutional Limits

2015. “Budgetary Negotiations: How the Chilean Congress Overcomes its Constitutional Limits.” Journal of Legislative Studies 21 (2): 213-231. PDF.

Recent research suggests that the Chilean Congress is marginalised in the policymaking process, especially when setting the budget. This paper argues that previous studies have overlooked the fact that the legislature uses two amendment tools – specifications and marginal notes – to increase the national budget and reallocate resources within ministries. This behaviour contradicts the constitution, which only allows Congress to reduce the executive’s budget bill. To test this empirically, a pooled two-stage time-series cross-sectional analysis is conducted on ministries for the years 1991–2010. The findings clarify how the legislature surpasses its constitutional limits and demonstrate that specifications are useful to predict when Congress increases or decreases a ministry’s budget.

September 29, 2023. “Aumentan las ex primeras damas al Poder Ejecutivo en América Latina” International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA). With Carolina Guerrero.

September 29, 2023. “Aumentan las ex primeras damas al Poder Ejecutivo en América Latina” International Institute for Democracy and Electoral Assistance (IDEA). With Carolina Guerrero.

Recientemente la ex primera dama Sandra Torres intentó, por tercera vez, sumarse a la también ex primera dama Xiomara Castro para transformarse en la segunda presidenta en ejercicio en América Latina en las controvertidas elecciones en Guatemala. El domingo 24 de septiembre, la ex primera dama Marta Linares de Martinelli confirmó que irá como candidata a vicepresidenta en las elecciones en Panamá en mayo de 2024 acompañando a su marido en la fórmula presidencial. Torres, Linares y Castro, quien gobierna Honduras desde 2022, se transformaron en políticas exitosas tras ejercer la función de primera dama. La relación no es casualidad: el puesto ha servido de manera creciente como trampolín para muchas políticas exitosas en América Latina.

La politización de las primeras damas las ha consolidado como miembros de la élite política (Guerrero Valencia y Arana Araya, 2019). Entre 1999 y 2016, ex primeras damas se presentaron 26 veces como candidatas a la presidencia, vicepresidencia, o el Congreso, resultando electas en 19 ocasiones (Guerrero Valencia y Arana Araya, 2018). Entre 1999 y 2023, nueve ex primeras damas se han presentado 19 veces como candidatas al Poder Ejecutivo. Este fenómeno ha aumentado significativamente desde 2010 principalmente en América Central, que concentra el 68,4 % de las candidaturas donde se han presentado un total de 13 de candidaturas al Poder Ejecutivo (seis a la presidencia y siete a la vicepresidencia) resultando electas en cinco ocasiones (una presidencia y cuatro vicepresidencias).

Estas candidaturas no dejan de ser controversiales por motivos vinculados principalmente a la eminente creación de dinastías políticas en democracias y a los límites legales electorales en algunos países. Tres casos llegaron a la Corte Constitucional de sus países: Raquel Blandón en 1989 y Sandra Torres en 2011, ambas en Guatemala, y Marta Martinelli en 2014 en Panamá. “Me divorcio del Presidente (Álvaro Colom) para casarme con el pueblo” dijo en 2011 Sandra Torres, con el fin de lanzar su primera candidatura presidencial. Sin embargo, la Corte Constitucional de Guatemala dictaminó que el inciso C del artículo 186 de la Constitución impedía su candidatura, al estar prohibida a los parientes dentro del cuarto grado de consanguinidad y segundo de afinidad mientras el presidente mientras permanece en funciones (Fernández, 2011).

Ex primeras damas al Poder Ejecutivo

Como muestra la Tabla 1, desde 1990 hasta ahora nueve ex primeras damas se han lanzado 19 veces como candidatas a la presidencia o vicepresidencia en América Latina, y han ganado en ocho oportunidades. Antes de Castro, Cristina Fernández fue la primera ex primera dama en llegar a la presidencia por la vía electoral (dos veces), y desde 2019 es la vicepresidenta de Argentina. Rosario Murillo ejerce como vicepresidenta de Nicaragua desde 2016 (reelegida en 2021), mientras que Margarita Cedeño ejerció como vicepresidenta en dos períodos, entre 2012 y 2020.

Tabla 1. Candidaturas a la presidencia y vicepresidencia de ex primeras damas (1990-2023)

País Nombre Experiencia política previa

(Cargo, años)

Período como primera dama Experiencia política posterior (cargo al que se postula, año candidatura) ¿Electa? Período
Argentina Cristina Fernández de Kirchner Diputada, 1989-1995 2003-2007 Presidenta, 2007 2007-2011
Senadora, 1995-1997
Diputada, 1997-2001 Presidenta, 2011 2011-2015
Senadora, 2001-2005
Senadora, 2005-2007
Presidenta 2007-2015 Vicepresidenta, 2019 2019-
Guatemala Raquel Blandón de Cerezo Ninguna 1986-1991 Vicepresidenta, 2011 No
Patricia Escobar de Arzú Ninguna 1996-2000 Presidenta, 2011 No
Sandra Torres Fundadora Partido Unidad Nacional de la Esperanza (UNE), 2002 2008-2011 Presidenta, 2015 No
Presidenta, 2019 No
Presidenta 2023 ?
Honduras Xiomara Castro de Zelaya Ninguna 2006-2009 Presidenta, 2013 No
Presidenta, 2022 Si 2022-
Nicaragua  Rosario Murillo Legisladora, 1984-1990 1985-1990 2007-2016 Vicepresidenta, 2016 Si 2017-2022
Vicepresidenta, 2021 2022-
Panamá Marta Linares de Martinelli Ninguna 2009-2013 Vicepresidenta, 2014 No
Perú

 

Keiko Fujimori Ninguna 1994-2000 Presidenta, 2011 No
Presidenta, 2016 No
Presidenta, 2021 No
República Dominicana  Margarita Cedeño de Fernández Ninguna 2004-2012 Vicepresidenta, 2012 2012-2016
Vicepresidenta, 2016 2016-2020
Vicepresidenta, 2020 No

Fuente: Elaboración propia.

Además de los casos mostrados en la tabla, en los últimos años hubo dos ex primeras damas que fueron precandidatas presidenciales, pero no llegaron a la elección: Margarita Zavala renunció antes de la elección presidencial en 2018 en México, mientras que Cristiana Chamorro no pudo competir en 2021 en Nicaragua porque fue arrestada por orden del gobierno. Además, está el caso de la ex Presidenta de Panamá entre 1999 y 2004, Mireya Moscoso, quien fue primera dama solo 11 días en 1968.

En el grupo de candidatas hay algunas que tenían una carrera política antes de ser primeras damas, como Cristina Fernández, Rosario Murillo, y Sandra Torres. Otras, a pesar de su inexperiencia inicial, con el tiempo se transformaron en políticas profesionales. Por ejemplo, Keiko Fujimori fue electa congresista (2006-2011) en Perú tras reemplazar como primera dama a su madre entre 1994 y 2000. Posteriormente, ella se ha presentado tres veces a la presidencia (2011, 2016 y 2021), siendo derrotada en todas las incursiones por un estrecho margen en la segunda vuelta electoral.

En Arana Araya y Guerrero Valencia (2022), mostramos que la probabilidad predicha de que las primeras damas con experiencia previa como políticas electas se presenten a las elecciones es del 70%, y que hay un 86% de posibilidades de que ellas compitan por llegar al Congreso, la presidencia o la vicepresidencia en la primera oportunidad que tengan tras dejar el Poder Ejecutivo.

La tendencia al alza de las candidaturas es clara: 15 de las 26 candidaturas que ocurrieron entre 1990 y 2016 se produjeron en los últimos seis años de la muestra. Desde 2016, ya son cinco las ex primeras damas que han competido por la presidencia.

La tendencia no es solo latinoamericana. En Estados Unidos, Hillary Clinton se convirtió en la primera ex primera dama en ser candidata al Senado (en 2001), a primarias presidenciales (2008), y a la presidencia (2016). La ex primera dama Michelle Obama luego resistió la presión para ser candidata. En Asia, la ex primera dama de Corea del Sur Park Geun-hye se convirtió en presidenta en 2013. En África, ex primeras damas han competido por la legislatura en Uganda y la presidencia en Ghana y Sudáfrica.

¿Por qué tantas primeras damas luego se lanzan como candidatas?

Como argumentamos en Arana Araya y Guerrero Valencia (2022), existen tres razones que hacen que sean candidatas únicas. Primero, ellas gozan de amplio reconocimiento público y cobertura mediática, lo que les permite darse a conocer, influenciar la agenda pública, y posicionarse en temas relevantes. Eso explica por qué muchas veces las primeras damas son vistas como ejemplos a seguir como mujeres, activistas o madres. Y cuando se involucran en políticas públicas, suelen ser en asuntos no controversiales que les dan popularidad, como promover una vida sana o inaugurar jardines infantiles.

Segundo, las primeras damas disfrutan de numerosos privilegios debido a su acceso al ápex del Poder Ejecutivo. La posición les permite desarrollar conexiones personales con las élites y así aumentar su propio capital político. Tercero, la imagen pública de las primeras damas está inevitablemente conectada al político más poderoso del país. Esto conlleva asociaciones tanto positivas como negativas, pero ineludiblemente la imagen presidencial se les transfiere parcialmente a ellas.

Creemos que la elección de ex primeras damas promueve la representación política de mujeres ya que ellas ayudan a compensar la disparidad de género que existe en puestos de poder. Ellas también ayudan a atraer a otras mujeres a puestos de elección popular y normalizan su participación en la arena pública. Sin embargo, la elección de ex primeras damas también refuerza las relaciones dinásticas en la élite política. Cuando se agregan ex primeras damas a la lista de familiares políticos en posiciones de poder en América Latina se refuerza también a las familias que ya se concentran en la cúspide, restringiendo la competitividad de los sistemas políticos regionales (Arana Araya, 2016).

 

 

Bibliografía 
Arana Araya, I. (2016). Democracia y matrimonios presidenciales Poca competencia y rotación en la élite política. Nueva Sociedad.
Arana Araya, I., & Guerrero Valencia, C. (2022). When Do First Ladies Run for Office? Lessons from Latin America. Latin American Politics and Society, 64(3), 93-116.
Fernández, D. (2011). Sandra Torres quiere casarse con Guatemala. Foreign Affairs Latinoamérica, 11(3), 2-11.
Guerrero Valencia, C., & Arana Araya, I. (2018). Mucho más que acompañantes: La irrupción electoral de las primeras damas latinoamericanas, 1990-2016. En J. Suárez-Cao & L. Miranda Leibe, La política siempre ha sido cosa de mujeres: Elecciones y protagonistas en Chile y la región. Flacso Chile.
Guerrero Valencia, C., & Arana Araya, I. (2019). Las primeras damas como miembros de la elite política. América Latina Hoy, 81, 31-49.

 

About the authors

Carolina Guerrero Valencia

Ignacio Arana Araya

Las elecciones de Guatemala podrían dar la presidencia a otra ex primera dama

Ver artículo original en https://latinoamerica21.com/es/las-elecciones-de-guatemala-podrian-dar-la-presidencia-a-otra-ex-primera-dama/

Este domingo la ex primera dama de Guatemala, Sandra Torres, podría profundizar el éxito electoral de las ex primeras damas en América Latina si se convierte en la segunda presidenta activa, luego de que la también ex primera dama Xiomara Castro asumiera la presidencia de Honduras en 2022.

Torres representa al partido conservador Unidad Nacional de la Esperanza (UNE) y corre en desventaja contra el diputado Bernardo Arévalo, un ex canciller y ex embajador en España que fundó el partido progresista Movimiento Semilla tras las protestas sociales que sacudieron al país en 2015.

La propuesta social de Torres es conservadora: se opone al aborto, al matrimonio entre personas del mismo sexo y promueve visiones cercanas a los evangélicos.Torres también ha prometido mejorar la seguridad pública apoyándose en ideas similares a las del Presidente salvadoreño Nayib Bukele, combatir la corrupción, promover el turismo, eliminar el IVA, entregar bonos mensuales a madres de familia y entregar ayuda económica y alimentos a los más pobres.

La segunda vuelta electoral ocurrirá en medio de una crisis institucional desatada por la decisión de la Fiscalía de suspender la personería jurídica del partido Semilla de Arévalo. La Fiscalía acusó al partido de fraude por usar más de 5.000 firmas falsas para registrar a la colectividad, pero la decisión fue revertida por la Corte de Constitucionalidad. “Es una situación preocupante en cuanto proceso electoral y en cuanto al funcionamiento de las instituciones de un Estado democrático” dijo recientemente el Secretario General de la OEA, Luis Almagro, al presentar el informe sobre la primera vuelta electoral. La Comisión Interamericana de Derechos Humanos también destacó “su preocupación por injerencias en el proceso electoral en Guatemala, en un contexto de falta de independencia del Ministerio Público y su fiscal general”.

Esta es la cuarta vez que Sandra Torres intenta convertirse en presidenta. En 2011 se divorció del Presidente Álvaro Colom “para casarme con el pueblo” a través de su candidatura, la que finalmente no prosperó debido a que la Corte Constitucional de Guatemala dictaminó que violaba  el artículo 186 de la Constitución. Torres no cejó, y en 2015 corrió como la candidata presidencial de UNE, el mismo partido que llevó a Colom a la presidencia, y terminó perdiendo en segunda vuelta ante el comediante Jimmy Morales. Torres lo intentó de nuevo en las elecciones de 2019, cuando también perdió en segunda vuelta ante el actual presidente, Alejandro Giammattei.

Ex primeras damas en el Ejecutivo

Desde 1990 ex primeras damas han intentado ser once veces presidentas y lo han logrado en tres oportunidades (Cristina Fernández en Argentina en 2007 y reelecta en 2011 y Xiomara Castro en Honduras electa en 2022). En el intento quedaron las candidaturas de Sandra Torres y Patricia Escobar en 2011 en Guatemala, Xiomara Castro en Honduras en 2013, Marta Linares en Panamá en 2014 y Keiko Fujimori en Perú en 2011, 2016 y 2021. Además, ocho veces ex primeras damas han sido candidatas a la vicepresidencia y han ganado en cinco oportunidades (Margarita Cedeño de Fernández en República Dominicana en 2012 y 2020; Cristina Fernández en Argentina desde 2019 y Rosario Murillo en Nicaragua en 2016 y reelegida en 2021).

Además de los casos descritos, en los últimos años hubo dos ex primeras damas que fueron precandidatas presidenciales, pero no llegaron a la elección:  Margarita Zavala renunció antes de la elección presidencial en 2018 en México, mientras que Cristiana Chamorro no pudo competir en 2021 en Nicaragua porque fue arrestada por orden del gobierno.

Las candidaturas de ex primeras damas a puestos de elección nacional son una tendencia creciente en América Latina. Entre 1999 y 2016, ellas se presentaron 26 veces como candidatas a la presidencia, vicepresidencia, o el Congreso, resultando electas en 19 ocasiones (Guerrero Valencia y Arana Araya, 2018). En la publicación When Do First Ladies Run for Office? Lessons from Latin America, mostramos que la probabilidad predicha de que las primeras damas con experiencia previa como políticas electas se presenten a las elecciones es del 70%, y que hay un 86% de posibilidades de que ellas compitan por llegar al congreso, la presidencia o la vicepresidencia en la primera oportunidad que tengan tras dejar el Poder Ejecutivo.

La tendencia al alza de las candidaturas es clara: 15 de las 26 candidaturas que estudiamos se produjeron entre 2010 y 2016. Desde 2016, ya son cinco las ex primeras damas que han competido por la presidencia. ¿Por qué tantas primeras damas luego se lanzan como candidatas?

Existen tres razones que hacen que sean candidatas únicas. Primero, gozan de amplio reconocimiento público y cobertura mediática, lo que les permite darse a conocer, influenciar la agenda pública y posicionarse en temas relevantes. Segundo, las primeras damas disfrutan de numerosos privilegios debido a su acceso al ápice del Poder Ejecutivo. La posición les permite desarrollar conexiones personales con la élite política y así aumentar su propio capital político. Tercero, la imagen pública de las primeras damas está inevitablemente conectada al político más poderoso del país. Esto conlleva asociaciones tanto positivas como negativas, pero ineludiblemente la imagen presidencial se les transfiere parcialmente a ellas. Esta semana Torres tendrá por tercera vez la oportunidad de por fin dejar atrás la sombra de su ex marido.